elizabear: (Default)
I am thinking about ordering some unusual grains and flours through Amazon, but in order to get their good prices, the quantities are huge. Would anyone be interested in going on on these?

Bob's Red Mill Gluten-Free Garbanzo Fava Flour, 22-Ounce Packages (Pack of 4) - $17.17 ($4.29/bag)
Bob's Red Mill Adzuki Beans, 28-Ounce Packages (Pack of 4) -$25.29 ($6.32/bag)
Bob's Red Mill Light Spelt Flour UNBL White, 22-Ounce Packages (Pack of 4) - $17.60 ($4.40/bag)
Bob's Red Mill Whole Grain Teff, 24-Ounce Packages (Pack of 4) - $22.15 ($5.53/bag)
Bob's Red Mill Whole Grain Teff Flour, 24-Ounce Packages (Pack of 4) - $24.74 ($6.18/bag)
Bob's Red Mill TVP (Textured Vegetable Protein), 10-Ounce Bags (Pack of 4) - $9.23 ($2.30/bag)
Bob's Red Mill Organic Coconut Flour, 16-Ounce Units (Pack of 4) - $24.86 ($6.21/bag)
elizabear: (Default)
I am thinking about ordering some unusual grains and flours through Amazon, but in order to get their good prices, the quantities are huge. Would anyone be interested in going on on these?

Bob's Red Mill Gluten-Free Garbanzo Fava Flour, 22-Ounce Packages (Pack of 4) - $17.17 ($4.29/bag)
Bob's Red Mill Adzuki Beans, 28-Ounce Packages (Pack of 4) -$25.29 ($6.32/bag)
Bob's Red Mill Light Spelt Flour UNBL White, 22-Ounce Packages (Pack of 4) - $17.60 ($4.40/bag)
Bob's Red Mill Whole Grain Teff, 24-Ounce Packages (Pack of 4) - $22.15 ($5.53/bag)
Bob's Red Mill Whole Grain Teff Flour, 24-Ounce Packages (Pack of 4) - $24.74 ($6.18/bag)
Bob's Red Mill TVP (Textured Vegetable Protein), 10-Ounce Bags (Pack of 4) - $9.23 ($2.30/bag)
Bob's Red Mill Organic Coconut Flour, 16-Ounce Units (Pack of 4) - $24.86 ($6.21/bag)
elizabear: (Default)
Is there anyone out there experienced in raised bed gardening who can give us a reasonable estimate of the money involved in setting one up? We're thinking of two, each about 4'x8'.
elizabear: (Default)
Is there anyone out there experienced in raised bed gardening who can give us a reasonable estimate of the money involved in setting one up? We're thinking of two, each about 4'x8'.
elizabear: (Default)
We were headed to the New England Aquarium last night, so we picked a restaurant at Faneuil Hall for dinner. We'd heard good things about wagamama (the lower case name is part of its design vibe) from friends and a Globe review and we love Asian food, so off we went, joined by our friend Arwen and her 6-yr old son, B.

The design is clean and funky. The tables are big 10' slabs of wood with fixed benches set in a Morse code pattern of dot-dash-dot, and people share them based on the size of their party. My favorite touch was a shelf under the table where you could put your bags or purses and have them safe as well as out of the way. There's an open kitchen along one wall, and each station has a big monitor where they receive the orders from the wireless handhelds used by the wait staff. As we were seated, we were warned that all of the food was made fresh to order, so things would not all arrive at the same time or in a specific order. It was pretty clear that what this meant was each station was working independently, so if you ordered something everyone else wanted too, you were going to wait longer than you would if "your" cook wasn't busy.

When you order, it's entered into the handheld unit the waitstaff carry in holsters, and the menu item number is written on your paper placemat so whoever brings the food knows what dish goes where. I suppose this solves some of the clunkier issues of table service. The menu clearly labels all of the ingredients, including shrimp paste, which is useful for people with allergies or kosher issues.

We'd thought things would be fairly kid friendly, and sure enough, there were kids under 6 at about 3/4 of the tables. In looking at the menu before choosing the place, we thought "plain chicken and noodles or rice, apple juice - that will be an easy sell". It wasn't quite: the mini chicken katsu (grilled chicken with a sauce on the side) was dry without the sauce. E didn't like the chicken plain, which I discovered by accident after he'd already chewed and rejected two pieces before accidentally trying the sauce and liking it. He also was not attracted to the noodles, even though I normally can't keep him out of my plain-noodles-that-should-have-sesame at home. The corn on the side was also a loss, despite him enjoying corn at home. Z thought the dish was okay, and ate the chicken and the noodles. He even ate the corn on the side despite it being surprisingly very cold - chilled in the 'fridge? For drinks, the orange juice was just fine, but the apple juice was rejected. It appeared to be whipped from some base and had a titch of lime in it, but none of the kids liked it. They like apple juice and apple cider, but were just turned off by the unfiltered texture and taste of this version, along with the foam.

We contemplated the duck gyoza, but DSR pointed out that this was the only item on the menu with duck, so it wasn't likely to be wonderfully fresh. We decided to split an order of the chicken version and one of the veggie version between the three grownups. This seemed like a wonderful opportunity for DSR to eat gyoza at a restaurant; they're normally pork, so we stick to frozen or home-made that are pork-free. Unfortunately, the veggie gyoza were bland, and the chicken gyoza were tasteless. This seems a cardinal sin when there's so much flavor that can be jammed into that little package. Even the dipping sauce didn't help much. As DSR noted in his own review, the frozen gyoza we buy are better than those. And [livejournal.com profile] the_nita's are best.

DSR and I decided to order two dishes we were both interested in, then swap. I started with the ginger chicken udon. I thought it was fine, and worth eating. I was already nearly half done by the time DSR's chicken chili men arrived, so we swapped and he started on the udon. He got a few bites in and stopped, asking if I was sure there wasn't shrimp paste in it. I'd already checked with the waiter that only the two items labeled as such on the menu had shrimp paste, but DSR found a flavor in it that he really didn't like, something salty and sharp. On later menu review, I'm wondering if it was the pickled red ginger garnish. The manager was delivering something to the table at this point, so I asked him again about shrimp paste, and he was just telling DSR he'd be happy to have the kitchen remake it just in case when B knocked his water glass off the table and shattered it. It was cleaned up quickly and efficiently and the offer to remake the dish was repeated, but by this time we were getting a bit tired of being there due to the slowness of service and the kids getting bored, so we'd already swapped back and I was finishing the udon.

DSR described the chicken chili men as spicy chicken cacciatore; it was a perfectly unexceptional dish, but not his idea of an exotic dining experience. Arwen felt the same about her own chicken chili men.

Now the service issues:

When we had placed our initial order, we noticed in less than a minute that we'd forgotten to put in E's order. Our waiter had stepped away, so we tagged another waiter and asked for it to be added. He seemed to be doing it, but it apparently never happened. After the food started arriving, we added it again, and it showed up right away. We told the waiter that E didn't like the apple juice and we asked for orange instead, and he brought a second apple. The next try was correct.

E had been playing in my water glass, so I gave it to him and looked for another. I really could not get anyone's attention to have this done until the waiter arrived to start delivering food. No one offered to refill the water during the meal. I needed to take E and Z to the bathroom after the meal; we were already waiting for the check, and I was very dismayed to discovered it still hadn't arrived by the time we all got back. It should be noted here that the restaurant doesn't have its own bathrooms, they point you to the marketplace bathrooms which are about 100 yards away. Finally, the waiter checked on our dessert status (none - we'd already been there an hour, and we just wanted to leave) and brought the check. Then we sat there for nearly another 10 minutes without our payment being picked up. We were not being subtle - E had his coat on, and I was standing up with my scarf around my neck and my bags on the table. There was starting to be a line at the door, and the host was busy clearing tables. He got to the one next to us, and I grabbed him with "I know you're trying to turn the table, but we would really like it if someone would please take our payment". He apologized and took it right away, and processed the split check correctly.

In summary; we didn't think the food was worth returning for, and the service was erratic and not what we were looking for when we had three kids 6 and under with us. I suppose we might try it again some time without the kids, but I think I could make stuff at least that tasty myself.

We also didn't enjoy the Bertucci's at Faneuil Hall when we there in Dec. The service there was fine, but it was surprising not to enjoy the food when we usually like it a lot. Perhaps we shouldn't have ordered from the seasonal specials menu there, but I loved a dish I had from the summer menu at the Woburn location. Maybe we should just avoid restaurants near Faneuil Hall; too geared towards tourists.
elizabear: (Default)
We were headed to the New England Aquarium last night, so we picked a restaurant at Faneuil Hall for dinner. We'd heard good things about wagamama (the lower case name is part of its design vibe) from friends and a Globe review and we love Asian food, so off we went, joined by our friend Arwen and her 6-yr old son, B.

The design is clean and funky. The tables are big 10' slabs of wood with fixed benches set in a Morse code pattern of dot-dash-dot, and people share them based on the size of their party. My favorite touch was a shelf under the table where you could put your bags or purses and have them safe as well as out of the way. There's an open kitchen along one wall, and each station has a big monitor where they receive the orders from the wireless handhelds used by the wait staff. As we were seated, we were warned that all of the food was made fresh to order, so things would not all arrive at the same time or in a specific order. It was pretty clear that what this meant was each station was working independently, so if you ordered something everyone else wanted too, you were going to wait longer than you would if "your" cook wasn't busy.

When you order, it's entered into the handheld unit the waitstaff carry in holsters, and the menu item number is written on your paper placemat so whoever brings the food knows what dish goes where. I suppose this solves some of the clunkier issues of table service. The menu clearly labels all of the ingredients, including shrimp paste, which is useful for people with allergies or kosher issues.

We'd thought things would be fairly kid friendly, and sure enough, there were kids under 6 at about 3/4 of the tables. In looking at the menu before choosing the place, we thought "plain chicken and noodles or rice, apple juice - that will be an easy sell". It wasn't quite: the mini chicken katsu (grilled chicken with a sauce on the side) was dry without the sauce. E didn't like the chicken plain, which I discovered by accident after he'd already chewed and rejected two pieces before accidentally trying the sauce and liking it. He also was not attracted to the noodles, even though I normally can't keep him out of my plain-noodles-that-should-have-sesame at home. The corn on the side was also a loss, despite him enjoying corn at home. Z thought the dish was okay, and ate the chicken and the noodles. He even ate the corn on the side despite it being surprisingly very cold - chilled in the 'fridge? For drinks, the orange juice was just fine, but the apple juice was rejected. It appeared to be whipped from some base and had a titch of lime in it, but none of the kids liked it. They like apple juice and apple cider, but were just turned off by the unfiltered texture and taste of this version, along with the foam.

We contemplated the duck gyoza, but DSR pointed out that this was the only item on the menu with duck, so it wasn't likely to be wonderfully fresh. We decided to split an order of the chicken version and one of the veggie version between the three grownups. This seemed like a wonderful opportunity for DSR to eat gyoza at a restaurant; they're normally pork, so we stick to frozen or home-made that are pork-free. Unfortunately, the veggie gyoza were bland, and the chicken gyoza were tasteless. This seems a cardinal sin when there's so much flavor that can be jammed into that little package. Even the dipping sauce didn't help much. As DSR noted in his own review, the frozen gyoza we buy are better than those. And [livejournal.com profile] the_nita's are best.

DSR and I decided to order two dishes we were both interested in, then swap. I started with the ginger chicken udon. I thought it was fine, and worth eating. I was already nearly half done by the time DSR's chicken chili men arrived, so we swapped and he started on the udon. He got a few bites in and stopped, asking if I was sure there wasn't shrimp paste in it. I'd already checked with the waiter that only the two items labeled as such on the menu had shrimp paste, but DSR found a flavor in it that he really didn't like, something salty and sharp. On later menu review, I'm wondering if it was the pickled red ginger garnish. The manager was delivering something to the table at this point, so I asked him again about shrimp paste, and he was just telling DSR he'd be happy to have the kitchen remake it just in case when B knocked his water glass off the table and shattered it. It was cleaned up quickly and efficiently and the offer to remake the dish was repeated, but by this time we were getting a bit tired of being there due to the slowness of service and the kids getting bored, so we'd already swapped back and I was finishing the udon.

DSR described the chicken chili men as spicy chicken cacciatore; it was a perfectly unexceptional dish, but not his idea of an exotic dining experience. Arwen felt the same about her own chicken chili men.

Now the service issues:

When we had placed our initial order, we noticed in less than a minute that we'd forgotten to put in E's order. Our waiter had stepped away, so we tagged another waiter and asked for it to be added. He seemed to be doing it, but it apparently never happened. After the food started arriving, we added it again, and it showed up right away. We told the waiter that E didn't like the apple juice and we asked for orange instead, and he brought a second apple. The next try was correct.

E had been playing in my water glass, so I gave it to him and looked for another. I really could not get anyone's attention to have this done until the waiter arrived to start delivering food. No one offered to refill the water during the meal. I needed to take E and Z to the bathroom after the meal; we were already waiting for the check, and I was very dismayed to discovered it still hadn't arrived by the time we all got back. It should be noted here that the restaurant doesn't have its own bathrooms, they point you to the marketplace bathrooms which are about 100 yards away. Finally, the waiter checked on our dessert status (none - we'd already been there an hour, and we just wanted to leave) and brought the check. Then we sat there for nearly another 10 minutes without our payment being picked up. We were not being subtle - E had his coat on, and I was standing up with my scarf around my neck and my bags on the table. There was starting to be a line at the door, and the host was busy clearing tables. He got to the one next to us, and I grabbed him with "I know you're trying to turn the table, but we would really like it if someone would please take our payment". He apologized and took it right away, and processed the split check correctly.

In summary; we didn't think the food was worth returning for, and the service was erratic and not what we were looking for when we had three kids 6 and under with us. I suppose we might try it again some time without the kids, but I think I could make stuff at least that tasty myself.

We also didn't enjoy the Bertucci's at Faneuil Hall when we there in Dec. The service there was fine, but it was surprising not to enjoy the food when we usually like it a lot. Perhaps we shouldn't have ordered from the seasonal specials menu there, but I loved a dish I had from the summer menu at the Woburn location. Maybe we should just avoid restaurants near Faneuil Hall; too geared towards tourists.
elizabear: (Default)
Our grape jelly, stored on the counter, has apparently gone alcoholic.

Now we know where Manischewitz comes from.
elizabear: (Default)
Our grape jelly, stored on the counter, has apparently gone alcoholic.

Now we know where Manischewitz comes from.
elizabear: (Default)
It's been a hard year for Verrill Farm, home of the Corn & Tomato Festival. First they had to cancel the festival because the fields were soaked and too muddy for parking, and now the farmstand building is gone. Since the fields are not damaged, they will be selling corn and tomatoes from an open-air stand near the farm, and they expect to be able to sell produce to restaurants and retail as usual.

http://www.wickedlocal.com/concord/homepage/x650666266/Four-alarm-blaze-guts-Verrill-Farm-building
elizabear: (Default)
It's been a hard year for Verrill Farm, home of the Corn & Tomato Festival. First they had to cancel the festival because the fields were soaked and too muddy for parking, and now the farmstand building is gone. Since the fields are not damaged, they will be selling corn and tomatoes from an open-air stand near the farm, and they expect to be able to sell produce to restaurants and retail as usual.

http://www.wickedlocal.com/concord/homepage/x650666266/Four-alarm-blaze-guts-Verrill-Farm-building
elizabear: (Default)
Wow - major bummer. Verill Farm in Concord has canceled their annual Corn & Tomato Festival (scheduled for this weekend) due to parking issues: the fields where festival attendees park have flooded due to all the rain this summer, and they can't dry out in time as more rain is forecast for the next couple of days.

My sister planned her vacation this year around attending with us. I guess we'll have to take their recommendation and get a sampling of tomatoes to take home and then make some of the recipes from their web site.
elizabear: (Default)
Wow - major bummer. Verill Farm in Concord has canceled their annual Corn & Tomato Festival (scheduled for this weekend) due to parking issues: the fields where festival attendees park have flooded due to all the rain this summer, and they can't dry out in time as more rain is forecast for the next couple of days.

My sister planned her vacation this year around attending with us. I guess we'll have to take their recommendation and get a sampling of tomatoes to take home and then make some of the recipes from their web site.
elizabear: (Default)
During a trip to Shaw's today, I tasted a sample of the steak tips that were on sale for $3.99/lb and picked some up. We doused them in our standard tips marinade - malt vinegar, brown sugar, and soy sauce - and grilled them. Incredibly delicious! I needed to take another trip to Stop & Shop and found that corn on the cob was 10 for $1.99. It was excellent, and combined very well with the steak tips and grilled mushrooms and peppers.

The trip to Shaw's was to buy wasp spray, as a wasp was busy building a nest inside the frame of the computer room window. The trip to Stop & Shop was to pick up some of my dad's favorite food as a little birthday gift to him (his birthday is the day after mine).
elizabear: (Default)
During a trip to Shaw's today, I tasted a sample of the steak tips that were on sale for $3.99/lb and picked some up. We doused them in our standard tips marinade - malt vinegar, brown sugar, and soy sauce - and grilled them. Incredibly delicious! I needed to take another trip to Stop & Shop and found that corn on the cob was 10 for $1.99. It was excellent, and combined very well with the steak tips and grilled mushrooms and peppers.

The trip to Shaw's was to buy wasp spray, as a wasp was busy building a nest inside the frame of the computer room window. The trip to Stop & Shop was to pick up some of my dad's favorite food as a little birthday gift to him (his birthday is the day after mine).

F&W hurrah

May. 5th, 2008 02:22 pm
elizabear: (Default)
Dude! In the category of "It never hurts to ask", I just got exactly what I wanted: another three years of Food & Wine Magazine for $9.95/yr.

I have been waiting and waiting for the renewal offers to get back down to that rate, what I paid last year, but it never went below $29.95/yr. So I called. Why is the rate 3x higher? Due to different promotions. I don't think I will renew at $30 - can I have a promotional rate? I see you were paying $9.95 - I'm authorized to renew you at that rate. Wonderful - can I have multiple years? I can renew you for three years at that rate.

DSR and I really enjoy reading F&W, and that and Entertainment Weekly are the only magazines we're guaranteed to read once they come into the house. DSR was willing to read F&W online, but having the paper edition makes it easier for me, so I wanted it if the price was right. I know they're all advertising supported anyway, so why would I pay even close to retail?
Yay!

F&W hurrah

May. 5th, 2008 02:22 pm
elizabear: (Default)
Dude! In the category of "It never hurts to ask", I just got exactly what I wanted: another three years of Food & Wine Magazine for $9.95/yr.

I have been waiting and waiting for the renewal offers to get back down to that rate, what I paid last year, but it never went below $29.95/yr. So I called. Why is the rate 3x higher? Due to different promotions. I don't think I will renew at $30 - can I have a promotional rate? I see you were paying $9.95 - I'm authorized to renew you at that rate. Wonderful - can I have multiple years? I can renew you for three years at that rate.

DSR and I really enjoy reading F&W, and that and Entertainment Weekly are the only magazines we're guaranteed to read once they come into the house. DSR was willing to read F&W online, but having the paper edition makes it easier for me, so I wanted it if the price was right. I know they're all advertising supported anyway, so why would I pay even close to retail?
Yay!
elizabear: (Default)
gakked from [livejournal.com profile] mayica:

An article in this week's New Yorker, Big Foot: In measuring carbon emissions, it’s easy to confuse morality and science raises the issue of whether locally produced food really is better for the environment.

The environmental burden imposed by importing apples from New Zealand to Northern Europe or New York can be lower than if the apples were raised fifty miles away. “In New Zealand, they have more sunshine than in the U.K., which helps productivity,” Williams [Adrian Williams, an agricultural researcher in the Natural Resources Department of Cranfield University, in England] explained. That means the yield of New Zealand apples far exceeds the yield of those grown in northern climates, so the energy required for farmers to grow the crop is correspondingly lower. It also helps that the electricity in New Zealand is mostly generated by renewable sources, none of which emit large amounts of CO2. Researchers at Lincoln University, in Christchurch, found that lamb raised in New Zealand and shipped eleven thousand miles by boat to England produced six hundred and eighty-eight kilograms of carbon-dioxide emissions per ton, about a fourth the amount produced by British lamb. In part, that is because pastures in New Zealand need far less fertilizer than most grazing land in Britain (or in many parts of the United States). Similarly, importing beans from Uganda or Kenya—where the farms are small, tractor use is limited, and the fertilizer is almost always manure—tends to be more efficient than growing beans in Europe, with its reliance on energy-dependent irrigation systems.
elizabear: (Default)
gakked from [livejournal.com profile] mayica:

An article in this week's New Yorker, Big Foot: In measuring carbon emissions, it’s easy to confuse morality and science raises the issue of whether locally produced food really is better for the environment.

The environmental burden imposed by importing apples from New Zealand to Northern Europe or New York can be lower than if the apples were raised fifty miles away. “In New Zealand, they have more sunshine than in the U.K., which helps productivity,” Williams [Adrian Williams, an agricultural researcher in the Natural Resources Department of Cranfield University, in England] explained. That means the yield of New Zealand apples far exceeds the yield of those grown in northern climates, so the energy required for farmers to grow the crop is correspondingly lower. It also helps that the electricity in New Zealand is mostly generated by renewable sources, none of which emit large amounts of CO2. Researchers at Lincoln University, in Christchurch, found that lamb raised in New Zealand and shipped eleven thousand miles by boat to England produced six hundred and eighty-eight kilograms of carbon-dioxide emissions per ton, about a fourth the amount produced by British lamb. In part, that is because pastures in New Zealand need far less fertilizer than most grazing land in Britain (or in many parts of the United States). Similarly, importing beans from Uganda or Kenya—where the farms are small, tractor use is limited, and the fertilizer is almost always manure—tends to be more efficient than growing beans in Europe, with its reliance on energy-dependent irrigation systems.
elizabear: (Default)
Memo to self: the roaster is so efficient that even a 23.4 lbs turkey cooks in 3.5 hours.

This was 90 minutes faster than expected, so we had to boogie to get the rest of the items finished.

Yummy, though.
elizabear: (Default)
Memo to self: the roaster is so efficient that even a 23.4 lbs turkey cooks in 3.5 hours.

This was 90 minutes faster than expected, so we had to boogie to get the rest of the items finished.

Yummy, though.
elizabear: (Default)
I've been seeing things about the "raw food" diet, including announcements for a local potluck, so out of curiosity I poked around to see how people deal with such a limiting set for preparation. That leads me to the question:

Can it really be called raw if it was in a dehydrator at 105 degrees for 8 hours?




Also, after poking around a bit more, it seems you can also saute something for a minute and still consider it "raw". I also conclude that you're in very real trouble if you're allergic to nuts (especially almonds).

Some of the recipes actually look pretty good - after all, I love gazpacho - but many of them are incredibly time consuming. Eating a healthy diet already takes a lot of time preparing and cooking, and while raw diet followers don't spend time cooking per se, some of the recipes do require hours of preparation/dehydrating to copy something that's simple if cooked, like pancakes.
elizabear: (Default)
I've been seeing things about the "raw food" diet, including announcements for a local potluck, so out of curiosity I poked around to see how people deal with such a limiting set for preparation. That leads me to the question:

Can it really be called raw if it was in a dehydrator at 105 degrees for 8 hours?




Also, after poking around a bit more, it seems you can also saute something for a minute and still consider it "raw". I also conclude that you're in very real trouble if you're allergic to nuts (especially almonds).

Some of the recipes actually look pretty good - after all, I love gazpacho - but many of them are incredibly time consuming. Eating a healthy diet already takes a lot of time preparing and cooking, and while raw diet followers don't spend time cooking per se, some of the recipes do require hours of preparation/dehydrating to copy something that's simple if cooked, like pancakes.
elizabear: (Default)
Anyone interested in joining us for a trip to the Corn and Tomato Festival tomorrow (Saturday)? We went last year, and it was delicious. We're probably going to aim to arrive right at noon.

http://www.verrillfarm.com/events.html

Corn & Tomato Festival
Saturday and Sunday August 18th & 19th, noon - 4 pm
Over 30 varieties of Verrill Farm sweet corn and tomatoes
$6.00 for tastings of these two favorite vegetables and samples of dishes prepared in the farmstand kitchen

Entertainment:
Pinehill Ramblers playing original & traditional bluegrass
Lil Folk Farm - petting farm
Giddy Up Ponies
Hayrides


The farm is just off Rt 2 in Concord, MA.
elizabear: (Default)
Anyone interested in joining us for a trip to the Corn and Tomato Festival tomorrow (Saturday)? We went last year, and it was delicious. We're probably going to aim to arrive right at noon.

http://www.verrillfarm.com/events.html

Corn & Tomato Festival
Saturday and Sunday August 18th & 19th, noon - 4 pm
Over 30 varieties of Verrill Farm sweet corn and tomatoes
$6.00 for tastings of these two favorite vegetables and samples of dishes prepared in the farmstand kitchen

Entertainment:
Pinehill Ramblers playing original & traditional bluegrass
Lil Folk Farm - petting farm
Giddy Up Ponies
Hayrides


The farm is just off Rt 2 in Concord, MA.
elizabear: (Default)

Happy birthday, [livejournal.com profile] liamstliam!



In spring news, I faxed in our heirloom and grape tomato seedling order to Verrill Farm in Concord. We love tomatoes, and the highly transportable ones from the grocery are just so bleah. We discovered Verrill Farms last August for the Corn & Tomato Festival, and after tasting, we picked up some really nice tomatoes to take home. I was eating their Super Sweet 100's like candy, and wished I'd had more, which leads to our experiment: we're going to try doing some container gardening, tomatoes only, on the patio this summer and see how it goes. Z likes helping with my mom's container garden, so I think he'll like this, too.
elizabear: (Default)

Happy birthday, [livejournal.com profile] liamstliam!



In spring news, I faxed in our heirloom and grape tomato seedling order to Verrill Farm in Concord. We love tomatoes, and the highly transportable ones from the grocery are just so bleah. We discovered Verrill Farms last August for the Corn & Tomato Festival, and after tasting, we picked up some really nice tomatoes to take home. I was eating their Super Sweet 100's like candy, and wished I'd had more, which leads to our experiment: we're going to try doing some container gardening, tomatoes only, on the patio this summer and see how it goes. Z likes helping with my mom's container garden, so I think he'll like this, too.
elizabear: (Default)
Native Sweet Corn Polenta
Verrill Farm
Concord, MA


4 Tbs unsalted butter
1 cup diced leeks, washed well
2 cups fresh corn kernels
2 cups whole milk
3 cups chicken broth
1 cup corn meal
3 Tbs grated parmesan cheese
salt & pepper to taste

Toss corn kernels in 1 Tbs corn oil and roast on a baking sheet at 400 degrees for 20 mins.
Cool.
Melt 2 Tbs of the butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Saute diced leeks 2-3 minutes, the add the roasted corn and cook 2 minutes. Add milk and broth and bring to a simmer. Slowly stream the corn meal in, whisking constantly to prevent lumps. When all corn meal has been added, lower the heat and stir constantly 4-5 minutes until corn meal is smooth and not grainy. Add remaining butter and the parmesan and cook 4-5 minutes longer.



(K, I think all the dairy might be a problem for the kids unless their allergies have changed or you have substitutes?)
elizabear: (Default)
Native Sweet Corn Polenta
Verrill Farm
Concord, MA


4 Tbs unsalted butter
1 cup diced leeks, washed well
2 cups fresh corn kernels
2 cups whole milk
3 cups chicken broth
1 cup corn meal
3 Tbs grated parmesan cheese
salt & pepper to taste

Toss corn kernels in 1 Tbs corn oil and roast on a baking sheet at 400 degrees for 20 mins.
Cool.
Melt 2 Tbs of the butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Saute diced leeks 2-3 minutes, the add the roasted corn and cook 2 minutes. Add milk and broth and bring to a simmer. Slowly stream the corn meal in, whisking constantly to prevent lumps. When all corn meal has been added, lower the heat and stir constantly 4-5 minutes until corn meal is smooth and not grainy. Add remaining butter and the parmesan and cook 4-5 minutes longer.



(K, I think all the dairy might be a problem for the kids unless their allergies have changed or you have substitutes?)
elizabear: (Default)
Hungry Coyote Restaurant on Moody St finally opened (with a great story in the Globe today), so we went to check it out.

The waitress had a little trouble with the drink orders, first bringing 4 things for Z to choose from because she wasn't sure what he wanted, then bringing me pineapple soda instead of lime, but it managed to work out. It was a little weird that she brought each person's drink immediately before taking another order, but she was very fast darting to the cooler and back. The kitchen also got so busy that I saw her finishing assembling some orders.

Most importantly, though, the food was very good. Mom said it was the most authentic Mexican food she'd ever had north of the border - I should think she'd know authentic, living in Mexico 4-6 months each year.

I got to sample the carne asada (very nice, very tender), chicken enchilladas con mole (a bit boring - better with the included salad on them), chicken taquitos (Z loved them), and chicken quesadilla (eat this one as soon as it arrives - it's fabulous while piping hot, and becomes merely good once it's been on the table for 10 minutes). [livejournal.com profile] dsrtao says the steak burrito was gigantic and tasty, though not quite as tasty as those from Anna's Taqueria. We also liked the (free) salsa that came with the (free) chips.

Prices are good, but the place got very busy quickly. We hit there at 6pm, just in time to get orders in before there was a line to the door. Service is a bit confusing - you can sit at a table and the waitress brings you menus/food/drink, but there are two signs over the counter setting up lines to order at the counter for eating in or taking out. Huh? I'm still confused about it.

Anyway, the joint was jumping when we left at 7pm, and still packed when we walked by again at nearly 8pm. I imagine a lot of it is related to the great publicity from the Globe, and I hope it settles into a steady flow of customers for them. They deserve it, and we Walthamites deserve a place whose main goal is to serve the locals as well as visitors.

PS - Lizzy's Ice Cream is still great.
elizabear: (Default)
Hungry Coyote Restaurant on Moody St finally opened (with a great story in the Globe today), so we went to check it out.

The waitress had a little trouble with the drink orders, first bringing 4 things for Z to choose from because she wasn't sure what he wanted, then bringing me pineapple soda instead of lime, but it managed to work out. It was a little weird that she brought each person's drink immediately before taking another order, but she was very fast darting to the cooler and back. The kitchen also got so busy that I saw her finishing assembling some orders.

Most importantly, though, the food was very good. Mom said it was the most authentic Mexican food she'd ever had north of the border - I should think she'd know authentic, living in Mexico 4-6 months each year.

I got to sample the carne asada (very nice, very tender), chicken enchilladas con mole (a bit boring - better with the included salad on them), chicken taquitos (Z loved them), and chicken quesadilla (eat this one as soon as it arrives - it's fabulous while piping hot, and becomes merely good once it's been on the table for 10 minutes). [livejournal.com profile] dsrtao says the steak burrito was gigantic and tasty, though not quite as tasty as those from Anna's Taqueria. We also liked the (free) salsa that came with the (free) chips.

Prices are good, but the place got very busy quickly. We hit there at 6pm, just in time to get orders in before there was a line to the door. Service is a bit confusing - you can sit at a table and the waitress brings you menus/food/drink, but there are two signs over the counter setting up lines to order at the counter for eating in or taking out. Huh? I'm still confused about it.

Anyway, the joint was jumping when we left at 7pm, and still packed when we walked by again at nearly 8pm. I imagine a lot of it is related to the great publicity from the Globe, and I hope it settles into a steady flow of customers for them. They deserve it, and we Walthamites deserve a place whose main goal is to serve the locals as well as visitors.

PS - Lizzy's Ice Cream is still great.

Feh.

Sep. 4th, 2005 01:32 pm
elizabear: (Default)
Carambola, our favorite Waltham restaurant, has been assimilated by its parent restaurants, Elephant Walk, right down to the menu.
EDIT: Okay, there are more dishes preserved than I thought there were - they just renamed everything en Francais.

Feh.

Sep. 4th, 2005 01:32 pm
elizabear: (Default)
Carambola, our favorite Waltham restaurant, has been assimilated by its parent restaurants, Elephant Walk, right down to the menu.
EDIT: Okay, there are more dishes preserved than I thought there were - they just renamed everything en Francais.

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