elizabear: (Default)
1. I need it.
2. I will need it in the near future.
3. I might need it at some point, and I might as well keep it around.
4. It is taking up space. Does it have a place to be out of the way?
5. I don't need it, and it's taking up space.
6. I resent that it's taking up space.
7. It needs to go away.
8. How can I get rid of it in a good way?
9. If someone can't take it off my hands very soon, I will take desperate measures.
10. Yay - it's out of my life!
elizabear: (Default)
1. I need it.
2. I will need it in the near future.
3. I might need it at some point, and I might as well keep it around.
4. It is taking up space. Does it have a place to be out of the way?
5. I don't need it, and it's taking up space.
6. I resent that it's taking up space.
7. It needs to go away.
8. How can I get rid of it in a good way?
9. If someone can't take it off my hands very soon, I will take desperate measures.
10. Yay - it's out of my life!
elizabear: (Default)
One of the bunnies in our back yard just came out to grab some lunch. When I told a friend recently that we had seen two bunnies together in the yard, she commented that if we had two, we were fairly certain to have more than two. ;)

I like the yard bunnies. We see them in the same spots and we see them every couple of days, so there's probably a burrow back there. The spot in the yard where the previous owners had a garden is still turning out carrots and who knows what, so the bunnies are probably foraging well even though the greens are mowed down every two weeks so the veggies aren't getting to be full size.

The ducks always herald the spring by splashing down in the pool. They show up together a lot until the eggs are laid, then they take turns foraging. My favorite part of the summer is when Mama Duck brings the tumbling line of babies into the yard for birdseed snacks. They get used to us, and won't run away unless we get within about 10ft. Sometimes Mama Duck stands in the yard and quacks until I bring out some seed, so she has me well-trained.

Spotting the groundhog is a rare treat - the photo two weeks ago was only the second time I'd seen one in the back yard in about two years. I don't think he lives in my yard, but visits now and then.

No sign of the muskrats this year. I'm perfectly happy to have them replaced with bunnies, since there's more than enough green stuff to spare for the bunnies (just stay away from the tomatoes and herbs, fluff-face!), and they don't build dams in the brook like the muskrats do.

And the rats have not reappeared since I put poison down the rat holes a few years ago. I enjoy the wildlife in the yard, but the rats were killing the baby bunnies and chasing off the birds. They had to go.

One of my friends who lives in the area and also has a variety of wildlife in the yard says it makes her feel like Snow White to sit and watch them frolic outside her windows.
elizabear: (Default)
One of the bunnies in our back yard just came out to grab some lunch. When I told a friend recently that we had seen two bunnies together in the yard, she commented that if we had two, we were fairly certain to have more than two. ;)

I like the yard bunnies. We see them in the same spots and we see them every couple of days, so there's probably a burrow back there. The spot in the yard where the previous owners had a garden is still turning out carrots and who knows what, so the bunnies are probably foraging well even though the greens are mowed down every two weeks so the veggies aren't getting to be full size.

The ducks always herald the spring by splashing down in the pool. They show up together a lot until the eggs are laid, then they take turns foraging. My favorite part of the summer is when Mama Duck brings the tumbling line of babies into the yard for birdseed snacks. They get used to us, and won't run away unless we get within about 10ft. Sometimes Mama Duck stands in the yard and quacks until I bring out some seed, so she has me well-trained.

Spotting the groundhog is a rare treat - the photo two weeks ago was only the second time I'd seen one in the back yard in about two years. I don't think he lives in my yard, but visits now and then.

No sign of the muskrats this year. I'm perfectly happy to have them replaced with bunnies, since there's more than enough green stuff to spare for the bunnies (just stay away from the tomatoes and herbs, fluff-face!), and they don't build dams in the brook like the muskrats do.

And the rats have not reappeared since I put poison down the rat holes a few years ago. I enjoy the wildlife in the yard, but the rats were killing the baby bunnies and chasing off the birds. They had to go.

One of my friends who lives in the area and also has a variety of wildlife in the yard says it makes her feel like Snow White to sit and watch them frolic outside her windows.
elizabear: (Default)
Cleaning up the sunroom led to examining the grocery circulars, which led to me going to the grocery store at 8pm because I needed to stock up on items that were on sale until midnight today.

Stop & Shop (a large grocery chain here in the northeast) has begun a new shopping method called "Easy Shop". The display of hand scanners caught my eye as I went in, and after reading the signs, the flyer, and the agreement, I decided I'd give it a try.

The premise is very simple: scan in your customer loyalty card, agree to the terms saying you'll be honest and such*, take the indicated hand scanner and shopping bags, and shop. As you take each item off the shelf, scan it and bag it. When you're done, you go to one of the self-checkouts and scan another bar code to end your order, scan in your loyalty card again, pay, and go. This struck me as remarkably sensible and easy, and indeed it was.

[I should add here that Costco does something like this when the register lines get really long. They have someone with a hand scanner roaming the lines, and they will pick someone in each line with a smallish order and pre-scan everything in the cart, along with your membership card. When you get to the cashier, they just scan your card again, and you pay and go.]

Back to Stop & Shop:
I was only getting a few specific items, but getting a lot of each because they were staple items that I stock up on. I went to the spaghetti sauce first, and tagged and bagged all of those. Then I went to the refrigerated section to tag and bag the hot dogs. The scanner could tell where I was in the store by what I was scanning, and it beeped for attention and offered me an unpublished coupon for a nearby item. I ignored it, and it dropped off the screen. Then I headed to the freezer section for veggies and ice cream, picking up a few cans of this and that on the way.

So when I reached the checkout, not only was my food already bagged, it was already properly loaded in the cart with the heavy stuff on the bottom and the freezer items all together, just the way I like it. (I tend to organize items on the belt so they have a better chance of being bagged and put into the cart properly, like making sure all of the bottles, cans, and jars go first, the bread and eggs last, etc.) I can imagine I might be less pleased with trying to manage packing the items from a more typical random shop with a few each of many different items as I progress from one side of the store to the other - Easy Shop seems best for either a small-to-medium shop or a stock up run like this was. The scanner is easy to use and the screen is easy to read. Every item is listed with its individual price, and you have a running total - another bonus if you're shopping on a budget and want to know where you are before you reach the register. The interface is also easy for removing an item.

As an incentive, Stop & Shop is offering $3 off your first Easy Shop of $30 or more. This wasn't actually announced anywhere, but I saw it in the small picture of the checkout area on the scanner start point. I also received an unpublished "personal thanks" coupon that took another $.50 off each carton of ice cream. Apparently there's a $4 incentive for your second Easy Shop, and $5 for your third. I will definitely be trying this again, though I have to think hard about it if I've got the kids with me. Saving the checkout time would be very cool, but they'd want to control the scanner and help with the bagging and that probably needs to wait until they're a bit older.

Only one couple was interested in what I was doing and asked me questions about it. Kind of surprising, as the scanner beeps everytime you successfully hit a bar code, so I was calling attention to myself. The guy said he hadn't really understood it, so he'd passed it by, but was curious. Since I'd read everything, I was able to answer his questions.

And, as an extra-special added bonus, using the scanner made the shopping kind of fun and I came home in a better mood.


* One of the things you have to agree to is the chance of a random audit. If you're flagged, an associate will come over and re-scan your entire order in the typical way to make sure it matches what you scanned yourself. I can't remember if there was any penalty if they didn't match, but I'm sure S&S will be checking to see if they have inventory shrinkage problems with this new checkout method.
elizabear: (Default)
Cleaning up the sunroom led to examining the grocery circulars, which led to me going to the grocery store at 8pm because I needed to stock up on items that were on sale until midnight today.

Stop & Shop (a large grocery chain here in the northeast) has begun a new shopping method called "Easy Shop". The display of hand scanners caught my eye as I went in, and after reading the signs, the flyer, and the agreement, I decided I'd give it a try.

The premise is very simple: scan in your customer loyalty card, agree to the terms saying you'll be honest and such*, take the indicated hand scanner and shopping bags, and shop. As you take each item off the shelf, scan it and bag it. When you're done, you go to one of the self-checkouts and scan another bar code to end your order, scan in your loyalty card again, pay, and go. This struck me as remarkably sensible and easy, and indeed it was.

[I should add here that Costco does something like this when the register lines get really long. They have someone with a hand scanner roaming the lines, and they will pick someone in each line with a smallish order and pre-scan everything in the cart, along with your membership card. When you get to the cashier, they just scan your card again, and you pay and go.]

Back to Stop & Shop:
I was only getting a few specific items, but getting a lot of each because they were staple items that I stock up on. I went to the spaghetti sauce first, and tagged and bagged all of those. Then I went to the refrigerated section to tag and bag the hot dogs. The scanner could tell where I was in the store by what I was scanning, and it beeped for attention and offered me an unpublished coupon for a nearby item. I ignored it, and it dropped off the screen. Then I headed to the freezer section for veggies and ice cream, picking up a few cans of this and that on the way.

So when I reached the checkout, not only was my food already bagged, it was already properly loaded in the cart with the heavy stuff on the bottom and the freezer items all together, just the way I like it. (I tend to organize items on the belt so they have a better chance of being bagged and put into the cart properly, like making sure all of the bottles, cans, and jars go first, the bread and eggs last, etc.) I can imagine I might be less pleased with trying to manage packing the items from a more typical random shop with a few each of many different items as I progress from one side of the store to the other - Easy Shop seems best for either a small-to-medium shop or a stock up run like this was. The scanner is easy to use and the screen is easy to read. Every item is listed with its individual price, and you have a running total - another bonus if you're shopping on a budget and want to know where you are before you reach the register. The interface is also easy for removing an item.

As an incentive, Stop & Shop is offering $3 off your first Easy Shop of $30 or more. This wasn't actually announced anywhere, but I saw it in the small picture of the checkout area on the scanner start point. I also received an unpublished "personal thanks" coupon that took another $.50 off each carton of ice cream. Apparently there's a $4 incentive for your second Easy Shop, and $5 for your third. I will definitely be trying this again, though I have to think hard about it if I've got the kids with me. Saving the checkout time would be very cool, but they'd want to control the scanner and help with the bagging and that probably needs to wait until they're a bit older.

Only one couple was interested in what I was doing and asked me questions about it. Kind of surprising, as the scanner beeps everytime you successfully hit a bar code, so I was calling attention to myself. The guy said he hadn't really understood it, so he'd passed it by, but was curious. Since I'd read everything, I was able to answer his questions.

And, as an extra-special added bonus, using the scanner made the shopping kind of fun and I came home in a better mood.


* One of the things you have to agree to is the chance of a random audit. If you're flagged, an associate will come over and re-scan your entire order in the typical way to make sure it matches what you scanned yourself. I can't remember if there was any penalty if they didn't match, but I'm sure S&S will be checking to see if they have inventory shrinkage problems with this new checkout method.
elizabear: (Default)
Sometimes I find something I would like to have in time to get it for my birthday or for Hannukah/Christmas, but usually my timing doesn't line up conveniently. I found something at Costco yesterday that I wanted, so I got it, and it's been declared the missing present from my birthday last May. Works for me.

Anyway - I now have a USB turntable! I've been trying to get my old turntable working, but it's got issues. Another turnable I got from a friend didn't do the trick either, so while I've been able to digitize cassettes easily, LPs were a no-go. Until now! It's the new model of the Ion turntable, and buying it at Costco makes it basically risk-free for me, so I took the leap. It's also nifty that it can be hooked up to the stereo as well. It was easier than pie to set up and use, and I did the first album last night - the original soundtrack album of The Muppet Movie. I only promised a friend a copy of this two years ago but couldn't manage it before! (Let me know if you're still interested, hon, and I'll drop a copy in the mail.)

Now to digitize all the other LPs I have sitting in the closet that were never released on CD (or have out of print CDs, like MM). And Mom, don't tell her! - but I think I might also make a funky mix MP3 set for my sister for Christmas from the collection of her old favorite 45s that I have here with me.

And then I can get that clutter out of the house, too! :)
elizabear: (Default)
Sometimes I find something I would like to have in time to get it for my birthday or for Hannukah/Christmas, but usually my timing doesn't line up conveniently. I found something at Costco yesterday that I wanted, so I got it, and it's been declared the missing present from my birthday last May. Works for me.

Anyway - I now have a USB turntable! I've been trying to get my old turntable working, but it's got issues. Another turnable I got from a friend didn't do the trick either, so while I've been able to digitize cassettes easily, LPs were a no-go. Until now! It's the new model of the Ion turntable, and buying it at Costco makes it basically risk-free for me, so I took the leap. It's also nifty that it can be hooked up to the stereo as well. It was easier than pie to set up and use, and I did the first album last night - the original soundtrack album of The Muppet Movie. I only promised a friend a copy of this two years ago but couldn't manage it before! (Let me know if you're still interested, hon, and I'll drop a copy in the mail.)

Now to digitize all the other LPs I have sitting in the closet that were never released on CD (or have out of print CDs, like MM). And Mom, don't tell her! - but I think I might also make a funky mix MP3 set for my sister for Christmas from the collection of her old favorite 45s that I have here with me.

And then I can get that clutter out of the house, too! :)
elizabear: (Default)
I was thinking about this last night and then talking to a younger friend about it, so I wanted to write it down.

The feelings you get sometimes of being awkward, uncertain, socially unsure, and uncomfortable in your own skin never go away even as you get older, so if you can do something to help yourself be more comfortable with who you are and how you live your life, you should do it.
elizabear: (Default)
I was thinking about this last night and then talking to a younger friend about it, so I wanted to write it down.

The feelings you get sometimes of being awkward, uncertain, socially unsure, and uncomfortable in your own skin never go away even as you get older, so if you can do something to help yourself be more comfortable with who you are and how you live your life, you should do it.
elizabear: (Default)
At [livejournal.com profile] msmemory's party two weeks back, I was chatting with friends about how outside of an SCA context it's a bit odd to see someone wearing "ethnic" clothing that doesn't seem to match the person's apparent ethnic background. Examples would be an African-American person in a kilt, an Indian person in a kimono, a Caucasian person in a sari, etc - an unexpected visual combination.

I wondered how someone of the clothing's ethnic background would look upon this out-of-context person, and I said I would ask an Indian friend of mine about saris. I finally remembered to ask her today! Her answer was very interesting: she said if she saw someone who looked like me wearing a sari on an ordinary day (my example), she would think (pretty much in order of her thoughts as expressed):
- that person knows something about Indian clothing and culture (provided it was worn correctly)
- that person might have been gifted with the sari by an Indian friend
- that person might be in a mixed marriage with an Indian
- that person is very confident and bold

She also said that Indians who have been in the US for a long time or those who are Indian-American have mostly relegated saris to formal occasions only and just don't seem to be comfortable wearing them around every day. Her mother-in-law, who was there today visiting from India, was in a sari. My friend was in a western-style dress.

I told her a bit about people in the SCA with Indian personas or who just like to wear saris (especially at Pennsic), and I admitted that I have 6 saris of my own, complete with cholis and pants or skirts. She said that if I let her know when I'm going to be someplace wearing a sari (like at our playground playdates), she will wear one, too!

I was prompted to remember to ask her after she commented this morning that the bright sun here is not like the bright sun in India - it feels hotter here. We'd had a conversation a few weeks ago about how people in India cover up in weather like this, but Caucasians in these parts tended to strip down instead. I talked about how those of us from white European stock frequently don't deal well with long periods of heat, especially if it's humid as well, and we don't spend much time in the sun while at the same time we try to expose as much skin as possible to whatever breezes we can find. She's starting to understand better, now, as she gets further into the MA summer - she's switched to sleeveless dresses, short sleeves, and shorts, and her son has started wearing t-shirts and shorts. Just last month, both of them were still in long sleeves and long pants while I'd already moved into shorts weeks before. And she's adapting for comfort, not for culture.
elizabear: (Default)
At [livejournal.com profile] msmemory's party two weeks back, I was chatting with friends about how outside of an SCA context it's a bit odd to see someone wearing "ethnic" clothing that doesn't seem to match the person's apparent ethnic background. Examples would be an African-American person in a kilt, an Indian person in a kimono, a Caucasian person in a sari, etc - an unexpected visual combination.

I wondered how someone of the clothing's ethnic background would look upon this out-of-context person, and I said I would ask an Indian friend of mine about saris. I finally remembered to ask her today! Her answer was very interesting: she said if she saw someone who looked like me wearing a sari on an ordinary day (my example), she would think (pretty much in order of her thoughts as expressed):
- that person knows something about Indian clothing and culture (provided it was worn correctly)
- that person might have been gifted with the sari by an Indian friend
- that person might be in a mixed marriage with an Indian
- that person is very confident and bold

She also said that Indians who have been in the US for a long time or those who are Indian-American have mostly relegated saris to formal occasions only and just don't seem to be comfortable wearing them around every day. Her mother-in-law, who was there today visiting from India, was in a sari. My friend was in a western-style dress.

I told her a bit about people in the SCA with Indian personas or who just like to wear saris (especially at Pennsic), and I admitted that I have 6 saris of my own, complete with cholis and pants or skirts. She said that if I let her know when I'm going to be someplace wearing a sari (like at our playground playdates), she will wear one, too!

I was prompted to remember to ask her after she commented this morning that the bright sun here is not like the bright sun in India - it feels hotter here. We'd had a conversation a few weeks ago about how people in India cover up in weather like this, but Caucasians in these parts tended to strip down instead. I talked about how those of us from white European stock frequently don't deal well with long periods of heat, especially if it's humid as well, and we don't spend much time in the sun while at the same time we try to expose as much skin as possible to whatever breezes we can find. She's starting to understand better, now, as she gets further into the MA summer - she's switched to sleeveless dresses, short sleeves, and shorts, and her son has started wearing t-shirts and shorts. Just last month, both of them were still in long sleeves and long pants while I'd already moved into shorts weeks before. And she's adapting for comfort, not for culture.
elizabear: (Default)
DSR, because he learns from his mistakes, is now at the point where he can have his main home system suffer a failed power supply and a dead hard drive and a) be back up and running in a short period and b) not have lost any data. This was proven this week.

Wish I learned as quickly. I still don't do backups like I should, and I put far too much trust in the hands of fate not coming back around and pinching me in the butt. And we all know fate is a letch.
elizabear: (Default)
DSR, because he learns from his mistakes, is now at the point where he can have his main home system suffer a failed power supply and a dead hard drive and a) be back up and running in a short period and b) not have lost any data. This was proven this week.

Wish I learned as quickly. I still don't do backups like I should, and I put far too much trust in the hands of fate not coming back around and pinching me in the butt. And we all know fate is a letch.
elizabear: (Default)
Thank god for the snowblower.

And thank heavens for DSR.
elizabear: (Default)
Thank god for the snowblower.

And thank heavens for DSR.
elizabear: (Default)
Z really wanted to go to gymnastics today after we missed his morning class, so we went this afternoon. There were only two kids, both make-ups. The radio traffic report noted there were vehicles in certain breakdown lanes after being hit with flying ice. I have to admit that there were two sheets of ice that came off my roof on the highway today, thankfully not hitting anyone. One was kind of close, but the pickup moved over to the next lane to avoid it (I was in the middle left, he was in the middle right, and had to move to the far right). The other flew off when there was no one behind me for quite some distance. It was from the front section, and judging by the noise, I think it flew up, landed on my roof, and then went off behind me. I really do try to get all the crud off my minivan roof - I even bought a telescoping broom to get the snow off because I'm so short, and man do I hate those driving igloos I see on the road with only a tiny windshield space cleared - but there was nothing I could do to get the ice off today. I think the sun and highway speeds took off the first piece, and the rest went off from the sun and from the crunch it got from the first piece.

Lots of stories of bad car accidents today, so I hope everyone gets home safely. I saw a couple of really crunched cars along the roadside, which definitely made me more cautious.
elizabear: (Default)
Z really wanted to go to gymnastics today after we missed his morning class, so we went this afternoon. There were only two kids, both make-ups. The radio traffic report noted there were vehicles in certain breakdown lanes after being hit with flying ice. I have to admit that there were two sheets of ice that came off my roof on the highway today, thankfully not hitting anyone. One was kind of close, but the pickup moved over to the next lane to avoid it (I was in the middle left, he was in the middle right, and had to move to the far right). The other flew off when there was no one behind me for quite some distance. It was from the front section, and judging by the noise, I think it flew up, landed on my roof, and then went off behind me. I really do try to get all the crud off my minivan roof - I even bought a telescoping broom to get the snow off because I'm so short, and man do I hate those driving igloos I see on the road with only a tiny windshield space cleared - but there was nothing I could do to get the ice off today. I think the sun and highway speeds took off the first piece, and the rest went off from the sun and from the crunch it got from the first piece.

Lots of stories of bad car accidents today, so I hope everyone gets home safely. I saw a couple of really crunched cars along the roadside, which definitely made me more cautious.
elizabear: (Default)
There was a flaw in my re-entry plan for the driveway. Okay, more than one. First, the sun melted some snow into slush in a critical area, but more importantly, my approach angle was totally wrong. The side of the car hit the snowbank and skewed me over into slush, and I'd probably be there still if not for a kind couple from CT who spent 15 minutes getting me out by rocking and pushing and shoveling. As for the car, the front underside apron is bent down - it pretty clearly got hung up on ice/snow when I went out backwards - but is otherwise fine.

I can get out again, but the approach back in has to basically be a straight line, 90 degrees from the roadway. Thankfully, there's a little street that almost lines up with my driveway, and I can shoot in from there.
elizabear: (Default)
There was a flaw in my re-entry plan for the driveway. Okay, more than one. First, the sun melted some snow into slush in a critical area, but more importantly, my approach angle was totally wrong. The side of the car hit the snowbank and skewed me over into slush, and I'd probably be there still if not for a kind couple from CT who spent 15 minutes getting me out by rocking and pushing and shoveling. As for the car, the front underside apron is bent down - it pretty clearly got hung up on ice/snow when I went out backwards - but is otherwise fine.

I can get out again, but the approach back in has to basically be a straight line, 90 degrees from the roadway. Thankfully, there's a little street that almost lines up with my driveway, and I can shoot in from there.
elizabear: (Default)
How hard is the ice crust outside? My car is driving on top of it.

I managed to get the ice off the car by using the scraper as a chisel to define an area, then I could pull up each section and discard. The sections were 6 inches thick, with snow underneath.

As for the plow pack at the head of the driveway, I chiseled away at it to make it more of a ramp from the street since the driveway itself is fairly level. We will test proof of concept in about 10 minutes to see if I can actually get out. And back in, of course.
elizabear: (Default)
How hard is the ice crust outside? My car is driving on top of it.

I managed to get the ice off the car by using the scraper as a chisel to define an area, then I could pull up each section and discard. The sections were 6 inches thick, with snow underneath.

As for the plow pack at the head of the driveway, I chiseled away at it to make it more of a ramp from the street since the driveway itself is fairly level. We will test proof of concept in about 10 minutes to see if I can actually get out. And back in, of course.
elizabear: (Default)
It's not so much the 4 inches of snow, it's the 2 inches of sleet and freezing rain on top of it.

Kudos to DSR for being so willing to clear the driveway, even if he did sacrifice the garden hose to the snowblower gods.
(I tried to tidy the area before the storm, but completely forgot about the hose outside the shed.)
elizabear: (Default)
It's not so much the 4 inches of snow, it's the 2 inches of sleet and freezing rain on top of it.

Kudos to DSR for being so willing to clear the driveway, even if he did sacrifice the garden hose to the snowblower gods.
(I tried to tidy the area before the storm, but completely forgot about the hose outside the shed.)
elizabear: (Default)
I was out doing good today.

While at the grocery store this morning, I found a nylon pouch in a shopping cart in the parking lot. It looked like a coupon holder, so I decided to turn it in to Customer Service in case someone came looking for it. When I took a peek inside, I was surprised to see about $200 in cash. The CS manager and I went through the papers in there and deduced it probably belonged to the Parks & Recreation Dept here in town, as it referenced a summer fun program on an expense report. They were called, and picked it up before I even finished shopping.

It's a good feeling to preserve summer fun for the kids.
elizabear: (Default)
I was out doing good today.

While at the grocery store this morning, I found a nylon pouch in a shopping cart in the parking lot. It looked like a coupon holder, so I decided to turn it in to Customer Service in case someone came looking for it. When I took a peek inside, I was surprised to see about $200 in cash. The CS manager and I went through the papers in there and deduced it probably belonged to the Parks & Recreation Dept here in town, as it referenced a summer fun program on an expense report. They were called, and picked it up before I even finished shopping.

It's a good feeling to preserve summer fun for the kids.
elizabear: (Default)
When the batteries in the TiVo remote start to wear down, the remote becomes less responsive. I tend to navigate the menus very quickly, so the delay in execution can cause odd things. Tonight, I was reading one upcoming show description when the screen flipped to the next description. I was in the middle of a sentence. Thus, what my brain read was "Adam and Jamie figure out how to help preschoolers participate in the show".

(Crossing MYTHBUSTERS with PLAY WITH ME SESAME)
elizabear: (Default)
When the batteries in the TiVo remote start to wear down, the remote becomes less responsive. I tend to navigate the menus very quickly, so the delay in execution can cause odd things. Tonight, I was reading one upcoming show description when the screen flipped to the next description. I was in the middle of a sentence. Thus, what my brain read was "Adam and Jamie figure out how to help preschoolers participate in the show".

(Crossing MYTHBUSTERS with PLAY WITH ME SESAME)
elizabear: (Default)
Advertisement: I'm playing in a LJ-type role-playing game based on the Vorkosigan novels of Lois McMaster Bujold. We're still a few characters short, so there's still time to get in on it. For info, go here.
elizabear: (Default)
Advertisement: I'm playing in a LJ-type role-playing game based on the Vorkosigan novels of Lois McMaster Bujold. We're still a few characters short, so there's still time to get in on it. For info, go here.

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